Vaporized

Vaporized - Part Seven

The Ice Cube or Vapour Box

The relationship between consumer and supplier features unending contradictions. While the consumer desires products that they control, ones that cost nothing to buy, take up no space, are infinately speedy, are of infinite high quality, are infinitely easy to use, and free to operate, suppliers require that one or more of these desires go unsatisfied in order to survive. The relationship is an unending battle to see how long any supplier will retain control over the relationship, and the customer will always ultimately, eventually win.
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Vaporized - Part Six

Legal Maneuvers

9:35am, October 14, 1913. The office of Wyndam, Colbert, and Weese, Attorneys At Law, Westfield Mass.

Present: Godfrey Wyndam, senior partner, and Hiriam Hull III, President of the Westfield Whip Company.

“I tell you, Godfrey, the whole town’s threatened,” Hull continued. “These horseless carriages have become more popular than anyone thought they would fifteen years ago. And as people replace their carriages with these horseless models, the market for our buggy whips is drying up. Remember, Westfield produces 95% of the buggy whips in the country and buggy whip manufacturing produces most of the livelihood in Westfield. Mine. Yours, too.” Slip over here for more ...
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Vaporized - Part Five

Locating The Vapor Point

That Spring of 2001, across the country in Portland, Oregon, True North project guidance strategies, the two-person training and strategic consultancy I’d founded eight years earlier, was barely keeping up with the burgeoning demand for our services. Following a humbling slowdown before Y2K, our client list had expanded to just beyond our ability to confortably service it. Where prior years had seen us make the occasional ten day trip, this year would see me in 53 different hotel rooms, some for as long as two contiguous weeks. One client had prepaid a year’s fees, and cash flow was more positive than ever in the company’s history.
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Vaporized - Part Four

The TidePoint Debacle

In the fall of 2000, Ray L. Steele, Director of the Ball State University Center for Information and Communication Sciences (CICS) invited me to attend their annual alumni awards banquet. Ray had, over the prior decade, built CICS into the graduate degree program most valued by the booming telecommunications industry. The program’s graduates were accepting six figure starting salaries at companies such as MCI, AT&T, and Anderson Consulting. My company had entered into a joint marketing agreement to sell our workshops to CICS’ community, building on a colleague’s use of our material in her Art and Science of Project Management class, a popular part of CICS’ curriculum. Our new relationship was to be introduced to the alumni at the awards banquet.
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Vaporized - Part Two

Part two of my 2003 work about discontinuous change...

No Language Describes It

We have no language to describe a vapourization, just like we have no satisfying description of death. We imagine, we might even find the faith to believe in an afterlife, yet we can search the archives and leave only certain that we’ve found no objective first hand account of what happens next. We describe from painful, shared experience the process of coping with the death of others, but find nothing but obscure scripture written in allegory, like the Tibetan Book of the Dead, to guide the steps of those passing away. We have descriptions of reinvention and re engineering, but these are continuous changes, where someone can track the differences between the old and the new. We can only characterize the missing spaces, the voids left behind by those who leave us. We cannot track their journeys once they leave.
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Vaporized - Part One

In 2003, I spent a few months working with Peter DeJager on a book about what he called Vapourization (note the Canadian spelling. Peter's Canadian.) Vapourization describes what happens when an industry becomes moot. Like when refrigeration replaced ice men. Like when automobiles co-opted the buggy whip industry. That book didn't find a publisher, but some of my best writing emerged out of that project. I'll snip some pieces into blog-sized bites. Here's a first piece. david

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