Intricate Choreography

Intricate choreography rarely succeeds. The impulses that encourage you to split resources between projects, tasks, and goals usually overlooks an individual’s true divisibility. Following two masters consumes more attention than following one.

One attention divided by two does not create one half. Nor does it create a short-time whole. It creates something more like one third. Who took the other piece that mathematics said would be available to complete the work? Think of that time being spent changing shoes, clearing then re-populating the desk, getting oriented to the different focus, or simply lost, like heat, in the transfer. It will really be lost, and attempting to recover it will only further dissipate available time.

The dilemma you face when this tactic seduces your otherwise solid reasoning asks you to integrate some new information. Creating intricate choreography denies this integration. Exactly equivalent to thinning paint so it will cover more surface, creating Intricate Choreography works on paper. It appears to completely resolve the difficulty, until you actually apply it to the difficulty.

You will have no problem enlisting people in this response. Even those most stretched by the re-assignment will find this tactic more immediately acceptable than any other available response. No need, certainly, to completely replan because of this little perturbation. We should be able to absorb some of this shock without completely rethinking our approach.

You will eventually find yourself rethinking your approach. Usually after some time creating an Intricate Choreography that didn’t deliver as it seemed to promise.

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